Museo Carlos Ameghino

From the Museo Carmen Funes I headed to the town of Cipoletti to visit the Museo Carlos Ameghino. This is the home of an unnamed ankylosaur collected from Argentina, and it was great to be able to check this material out for myself. Gondwanan ankylosaurs are relatively rare; in addition to this specimen, there’s Minmi from Australia, fragmentary remains from New Zealand, and Antarctopelta from Antarctica. Continue reading

Hadrosaurs get their moment in the sun.

Living in Edmonton means I’m in close proximity to the dinosaur capitalĀ of Canada, Drumheller, and the wonderful Royal Tyrrell Museum. Last week the U of A crew headed down to the Hadrosaur Symposium, a wonderful event by all accounts with lots of interesting talks and good conversation. I won’t report on the science presented as much of the research is as yet unpublished (although look out for the eventual symposium volume), but thought I would share a few photos and links to symposium goodies. Continue reading

Congratulations Phil Bell!

Some congratulations are in order for my fellow grad student Phil Bell, who successfully defended his PhD thesis today!

Phil’s thesisĀ is titled “Systematics and palaeobiology of the crested hadrosaurine Saurolophus, from Canada and Mongolia.” He’s been working for the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum (previously the River of Death and Discovery Dinosaur Museum) since last fall.

You can read more about his work on Saurolophus in these papers; I’m sure there will be several more to come:

Bell PR, Evans DC. 2010. Revision of the status of Saurolophus (Hadrosauridae) from California, USA. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 47:1417-1426.

Bell PR. 2011. Redescription of the skull of Saurolophus osborni Brown 1912 (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae). Cretaceous Research 32:30-44.

Bell PR. In press. Cranial osteology and ontogeny of Saurolophus angustirostris from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia with comments on Saurolophus osborni from Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica.

The winter term draws to a close, the fossils come out of hiding one last time.

We are very fortunate at the University of Alberta to offer several courses in Palaeontology (and not just through zoology or biology – they get their own PALEO course code). PALEO 418 and 419 cover vertebrate palaeontology in lecture and lab format, PALEO 414 focuses more on invertebrate paleontology and functional morphology, and PALEO 400 is a field school held right in Edmonton at the Danek hadrosaur bonebed. Continue reading